Een dieet met veel noten verhoogt niet overgewicht

Research Question:
Epidemiological studies have reported an inverse association between the frequency of nut consumption and BMI and the risk of obesity. However, clinical studies on the relationship between nut consumption and overweight are scarce and unconvincing. It was therefore carried out this review article.

Increases the risk of overweight eating lots of nuts?

Study Design:
This overview article contained 33 clinical trials.

There was no question of publication bias.
This meta-analysis used the weighted average difference and the random-effects model.

Results and conclusions:
The researchers found that a diet high in nuts compared with little nuts, the weight does not significantly with 0.47 kg [95% CI =-1.17 to 0.22 kg, I2 = 7%] reduced.
Not significant is, there can not be said with 95% reliability that a diet high in nuts with 0.47 kg reduced the weight really.

The researchers found that a diet high in nuts compared with little nuts, the BMI is not significant with 0.40 point [WMD =-0.40 kg/m (2), 95% CI =-0.97 to 0.17 kg/m (2), I2 = 49%] reduced.
Not significant is, there is no link to a 95% reliability.

The researchers found that a diet high in nuts compared with little nuts, the waist circumference not significant with 1.25 cm [WMD =-1.25 cm, 95% CI =-2.82 to 0.31 cm, I2 = 28%] reduced.

The researchers concluded that a diet high in nuts the chance of getting overweight not raised or lowered.

Original title:
Utility intake and adiposity: meta-analysis of clinical trials by Flores-Mateo G, Rojas-Rueda D, [...], Salas-Salvad├│ J.

Link:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23595878

Additional information about El Mondo:
Read more about overweight.
Read more about I2, publication bias and significance.

At the pooling (merge) of the individual results in a meta-analysis, can geïncludeerde to the results of the studies a statistical weight. This weighting factor, is it possible to give more weight to the analysis in the studies with a larger number of patients or with a better methodological quality.
Conclusions of studies with a larger number of patients or with a better methodological quality are more reliable than studies with a smaller number of patients or with poor methodological quality.
The weighted mean difference (WMD) is the result of a meta-analysis of the pooled and weighted results of studies with continuous outcomes (including averages and standard deviations).